Click here to view my curriculum vitae.

In 2017, I joined the Department of Sociology at Yale University as a doctoral student.

I am a Junior Fellow at the Yale Center for Cultural Sociology, as well as a Junior Fellow for the Initiative on Religion, Politics, and Society at the Yale MacMillan Center. My research blends cultural sociology and comparative-historical methods to study charisma, religion, and power, specifically interactions between charismatic Christian communities and political structures in society. Currently, I have two developing projects: one researching early modern Britain and the Puritan settlement in Massachusetts Bay colony in the 17th century, and the second investigating the culture of American evangelical higher education. I am also interested in cultural trauma during and following imperial projects, as well as white Christian nationalism, the 2007 U.S. financial crisis, and the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

I earned a B.A. in History from Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts in 2010, where I focused on classical literature, ancient religion, and medieval art and spiritual-political intersections. I presented my senior thesis, entitled "Hagia Sophia: Political and Religious Crossroads" at the biennial Conference on Faith and History at George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon in 2010. 

I then went on to earn a second B.A. in Sociology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2016, where I graduated summa cum laude, with distinction. While at CU-Boulder, I was advised by Dr. Isaac Reed (now Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia), and worked as his research assistant. My honors thesis, "A Shared Revelation: Charismatic Communities and the Puritan Experiment in Early New England,” chaired by Dr. Isaac Reed, and co-advised by historian, Dr. Fred Anderson, won the Val & Helen Fischer Award for Outstanding Scholarship at CU (given to one graduating senior in economics, political science, anthropology, or sociology), and the Jen Hlavacek Award (presented by the Honors College for the best paper on matters of religion). I presented an early draft of this paper on a panel at the 2015 Social Science History Association annual meeting in Baltimore, MD.

 At CU, I also completed a quantitative paper,  “Navigating Religious & Sexual Identities at a Christian College,” which investigated mental health disparities and educational experiences of self-identified LGBQ students (N=255) at a faith-based college in the eastern United States. This paper was advised by Dr. Stefanie Mollborn, and was presented at the Honors Roundtable Session at the 2015 American Sociological Association annual meeting in Chicago, IL.

Originally from Boulder, CO, I currently live in New Haven, CT with my husband, Spencer. 


Photograph on this page by Rab Fyfe.